Best way to take pictures that tell a story?

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Shooter41

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Sep 19, 2021
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Don Marler
After photographing the Wichita Wings Indoor Soccer team for forty-two years, I have concluded that it is critical for me to hold back on pressing the shutter button when I shouldn't. If I get shutter happy with my, "Sony of my Owny" set on "auto," I end up with far too many throw aways and camera clicks. I have learned that I need to first see something about to happen on the pitch that will allow my image to tell my viewers a story all on its own. One of my favorite shots I took is of our outstanding goal keeper, who has a habit of imitating the French mime, Marcel Marceau, by practicing, "the art of silence." This way he avoids embarrassing the referree and being tossed out of the game for abuse. When an opposing player crashed into our goal keeper right in front of his goal, rather than jumping up and screaming at the referee, who did not blow his whistle, our goal keeper got his message across, without saying a word. Shooter41
 

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Sorefined

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May 20, 2022
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Ray Richardson
I agree, Images which tell a story, irrespective of the genre, are often the most pleasing and interesting to others......
unconnected images which do not inspire the viewers interest to understand the intent or overall story line usually
fade into obscurity in the shortest time........
 

Shooter41

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Sep 19, 2021
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Don Marler
After photographing the Wichita Wings Indoor Soccer team for forty-two years, I have concluded that it is critical for me to hold back on pressing the shutter button when I shouldn't. If I get shutter happy with my, "Sony of my Owny" set on "auto," I end up with far too many throw aways and camera clicks. I have learned that I need to first see something about to happen on the pitch that will allow my image to tell my viewers a story all on its own. One of my favorite shots I took is of our outstanding goal keeper, who has a habit of imitating the French mime, Marcel Marceau, by practicing, "the art of silence." This way he avoids embarrassing the referree and being tossed out of the game for abuse. When an opposing player crashed into our goal keeper right in front of his goal, rather than jumping up and screaming at the referee, who did not blow his whistle, our goal keeper got his message across, without saying a word. Shooter41
Dear Sorefined... Well spoken, sir. I find that the best response to my images has come from viewers who imaged what they thought was going on the instant I took the picture. Often they want to discuss how close their interpretation of what happened is to what actually was happening. Shooter41
I agree, Images which tell a story, irrespective of the genre, are often the most pleasing and interesting to others......
unconnected images which do not inspire the viewers interest to understand the intent or overall story line usually
fade into obscurity in the shortest time........
 

iain clyne

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Apr 9, 2022
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Iain Clyne
Understanding what you shoot is important to getting the story as you learn to see what’s about to happen before it happens.
As a retired professional photographer shooting sports and some press work I always aimed to get something that told a story but keep the number of shots down to a manageable level. I started in the film days and was limited to 3 rolls of 36 exposure films so when digital came I still shot no more than 300 shots max. Some of the others were shooting 800-1000 shots at a football or rugby match. Guess who had images on the editors desk first.
 

Shooter41

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Sep 19, 2021
Name
Don Marler
Understanding what you shoot is important to getting the story as you learn to see what’s about to happen before it happens.
As a retired professional photographer shooting sports and some press work I always aimed to get something that told a story but keep the number of shots down to a manageable level. I started in the film days and was limited to 3 rolls of 36 exposure films so when digital came I still shot no more than 300 shots max. Some of the others were shooting 800-1000 shots at a football or rugby match. Guess who had images on the editors desk first.
Dear iain clyne....You are absolutely correct. Quality over quantity is best when it comes to how many pictures do you have to take to end up with a beauty. Having started 42 years ago shooting 36 exposure; Black and White; Tri-X film rated at 400 ASA was excellent training on how not to waste film, chemicals and camera clicks. Shooting a higher percentage of winners versus losers is an excellent way to train ourselves to take less pictures to cull; edit and deliver and still end up with excellent images is my goal. Thank you for your insights. Shooter41
 

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