Best SD Memory Card Option

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Lake Travis Doug

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I'm awaiting delivery of my new Sony a7r IVa and want to use the fastest but most cost-effective memory cards. Anyone have advice? It appears there are cards that are 300Mbs, so that would seem to be the fastest.
Thanks
 
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garuda

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I'm awaiting delivery of my new Sony a7r IVa and want to use the fastest but most cost-effective memory cards. Anyone have advice? It appears there are cards that are 300Mbs, so that would seem to be the fastest.
Thanks
I've been using the Sony Tough 277/150MBs - 256GB card with no issues on my 7R iv. I don't think the 300s are necessary for most users. IMO, in certain high demanding situations the 300-card may be necessary and will justify the extra expense. But I do both video and 5-10 shot bursts w 7Riv with no problems so far.

See Tim's excellent write-up on SD cards below:

Tim Mayo's card review

SD card Thread


Sony Tough SD card.JPG
 

Lake Travis Doug

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I've been using the Sony Tough 277/150MBs - 256GB card with no issues on my 7R iv. I don't think the 300s are necessary for most users. IMO, in certain high demanding situations the 300-card may be necessary and will justify the extra expense. But I do both video and 5-10 shot bursts w 7Riv with no problems so far.

See Tim's excellent write-up on SD cards below:

Tim Mayo's card review

SD card Thread


View attachment 10800
Also, I have four of these that I used with my Nikon D7100, I know they'll be slow for the A7r IVa, but assuming I actually GET the camera before I decide on memory cards, I can use these for the interim.
I've been using the Sony Tough 277/150MBs - 256GB card with no issues on my 7R iv. I don't think the 300s are necessary for most users. IMO, in certain high demanding situations the 300-card may be necessary and will justify the extra expense. But I do both video and 5-10 shot bursts w 7Riv with no problems so far.

See Tim's excellent write-up on SD cards below:

Tim Mayo's card review

SD card Thread


View attachment 10800
Thanks, I don't plan to even shoot much video, the only demanding thing (at least initially) I WILL be doing is 5 bracket multiple exposure shooting, though I may play around with the 9 bracket (seems excessive to me). Thanks for the advice. I do have four of these from my Nikon D7100 that I can use until I make a decision, assuming I get the camera before I do that!
 

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Reciprocum

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The 5 cards I have hands-on experience with are the 5 lined up bellow (sorry for the crapy blurred shot)
Of those only the last 2 would be suitable match for your A7RivA but, due to the large file size of that model I would suggest Sony's 128gb SF-M128T (not in picture) because a 64gb card will only hold about 70 such 9-bracketed uncompressed RAWs.

If you think you might evolve into more frequent action bursting in the future (m-shutter only with the A7R4 because of high rolling shutter) then skip that and go directly to the right/last one: SF-G128T (good luck finding one in stock ...) as the most cost-effective way to spend money in memory cards is to get it right the first time ;-)

210627 M3_00001-Web.jpg
 
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garuda

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I don't know the demands of 5/9 bracket shooting, so you'll have to experiment. Your current SanDisk 170MB/64GB might be fine, even for 7Riv shots depending on what you are shooting. Try it.

Also, I like 128 or 256GB cards so usually no need to switch cards during all day shoots. As I mentioned already, you bought a really good camera! No mistake there. Be thankful for that.
 
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Lake Travis Doug

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I don't know the demands of 5/9 bracket shooting, so you'll have to experiment. Your current SanDisk 170MB/64GB might be fine, even for 7Riv shots depending on what you are shooting. Try it.

Also, I like 128 or 256GB cards so usually no need to switch cards during all day shoots. As I mentioned already, you bought a really good camera! No mistake there. Be thanks for that.
Thanks, after looking at some of the ratings and reviews, I think your comments about the Sony 256GB SF-M Tough Series UHS-II SDXC Memory Cards represent the best option, they're a lot more affordable than the 300mb ones and I'm quite sure I won't be doing anything that will be that demanding. Plus, I can actually get them!
 

Reciprocum

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Thanks, after looking at some of the ratings and reviews, I think your comments about the Sony 256GB SF-M Tough Series UHS-II SDXC Memory Cards represent the best option, they're a lot more affordable than the 300mb ones and I'm quite sure I won't be doing anything that will be that demanding. Plus, I can actually get them!
Just don't forget that when you loose (or it breaks down) a 256gb card its 256gb of storage that are gone at once. I would rather get 2x 128gb and use them in tandem (since the A7R4 has 2 slots) in either simultaneous (redundant) mode or spill-over mode.
 
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Lake Travis Doug

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Just don't forget that when you loose (or it breaks down) a 256gb card its 256gb of storage that are gone at once. I would rather get 2x 128gb and use them in tandem (since the A7R4 has 2 slots) in either simultaneous (redundant) mode or spill-over mode.
Understood. I've never had an issue, but that's exactly why I have always set up dual card storage for redundancy. I will continue to do the same and that's why I think 256GB is probably more appropriate for me so I just ordered two of the Sony 256GB SF-M Tough Series UHS-II SDXC cards. I also just found out the A7r IVa and 24-105 f/4 G will ship on the 1st, I already received the 12-24mm f/2.8 GM... HUZZAH! Again, I feel like a kid waiting for Santa... and that says a lot, because I'm Jewish! 😁
 
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garuda

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Just don't forget that when you loose (or it breaks down) a 256gb card its 256gb of storage that are gone at once. I would rather get 2x 128gb and use them in tandem (since the A7R4 has 2 slots) in either simultaneous (redundant) mode or spill-over mode.
Afonso, we'll have to agree to disagree on this one. You being a pro, with client pics at risk, you must behave with insurance in mind and hence redundant cards for client safety. I get that, and your wisdom would be correct in this for the pros.

But for average shooters or careful people — who often loses or breaks a card? You insert card(s) in camera, format, shoot, remove card and copy contents to computer or backup drive, archive another copy, verify integrity, put card back into camera, format card (or erase with computer), and commence shooting again. Only risk of losing or breaking card is the 20-seconds transferring card betw cam and computer. With a 256GB card, no need to change cards (or lose them) during a day's shoot in the field.

Of course, if moving card(s) from camera to computer, you carelessly drop the SD card on a concrete floor and all the pixel bits spill out of the card cells and onto the floor, then your theory would prove correct. Since the pixels are too small to collect from floor and re-align them into each exact sequence to make each photo perfectly original, not to mention the time involved, and assuming your cat doesn't mischievously eat some of the spilled pixels off the floor while you are collecting them.

And Afonso, I seriously applaud you for genuinely having the best of intentions to help others make the best decisions. I mean that! But the remote chance of breaking/losing a card full of photos of grandma, grand kids, owls, eagles, low-flying pterosaurs, aunt Martha's birthday party, and the pet dog — cannot quite compare to the loss of the of client photos/footage by a professional. So yes, the Pro must plan for over-kill.
Besides, Martha will have another mind-numbing birthday party next year... so no real loss there.

Afonso, your advice is good, as usual, but maybe not necessarily best tailored for us poor everyday struggling hobbyist who pretend to know how to use a camera that happens to have more intelligence than all the combined grey-matter of our entire family. I just try to be practical and tailor the suggests to a specific questioner (as best I can, while not knowing their exact situation).

Boy... that was a long one. I need a nap. (And I don't believe a word I said here either). :)
 

Lake Travis Doug

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Afonso, we'll have to agree to disagree on this one. You being a pro, with client pics at risk, you must behave with insurance in mind and hence redundant cards for client safety. I get that, and your wisdom would be correct in this for the pros.

But for average shooters or careful people — who often loses or breaks a card? You insert card(s) in camera, format, shoot, remove card and copy contents to computer or backup drive, archive another copy, verify integrity, put card back into camera, format card (or erase with computer), and commence shooting again. Only risk of losing or breaking card is the 20-seconds transferring card betw cam and computer. With a 256GB card, no need to change cards (or lose them) during a day's shoot in the field.

Of course, if moving card(s) from camera to computer, you carelessly drop the SD card on a concrete floor and all the pixel bits spill out of the card cells and onto the floor, then your theory would prove correct. Since the pixels are too small to collect from floor and re-align them into each exact sequence to make each photo perfectly original, not to mention the time involved, and assuming your cat doesn't mischievously eat some of the spilled pixels off the floor while you are collecting them.

And Afonso, I seriously applaud you for genuinely having the best of intentions to help others make the best decisions. I mean that! But the remote chance of breaking/losing a card full of photos of grandma, grand kids, owls, eagles, low-flying pterosaurs, aunt Martha's birthday party, and the pet dog — cannot quite compare to the loss of the of client photos/footage by a professional. So yes, the Pro must plan for over-kill.
Besides, Martha will have another mind-numbing birthday party next year... so no real loss there.

Afonso, your advice is good, as usual, but maybe not necessarily best tailored for us poor everyday struggling hobbyist who pretend to know how to use a camera that happens to have more intelligence than all the combined grey-matter of our entire family. I just try to be practical and tailor the suggests to a specific questioner (as best I can, while not knowing their exact situation).

Boy... that was a long one. I need a nap. (And I don't believe a word I said here either). :)
Agreed.... but how did you know I have photos of pterosaurs and some chipmunks? Seriously, though. One of my main purposes is (semi?) professional photography of my own, mostly high-end real estate listings. The last thing I want is to find out my card is bad after I've spent a couple of hours shooting the interior and exterior of a 7,000 sq.ft. home. Also, I think with the new USB 3.2 connection on the a7r IVa, I might just do my transfers that way.
 
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garuda

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.... Also, I think with the new USB 3.2 connection on the a7r IVa, I might just do my transfers that way.
You are correct. The USB3 port can do that. And, in previous post, I failed to mention using two of the 256 cards for redundancy, which is what I use religiously. Then there's not much risk. And for your real estate stuff, this should be safe enough w two 256s. Of course, Afonso is right in that there is always a remote risk of a card anomaly, but redundancy should minimize that.

And the reason for my pref for large SDs is that I have a stable full of small worthless 4GB to 64GB cards I never use. Hence the wisdom, buy the biggest capacity you can afford. That's likely what Afonso meant when saying "Buy wisely in the beginning (large ones). That way, the only real risk is if they go bad inside the camera... which is remotely possible. Client work needs redundancy and backup archives, as you already know.

Afonso is usually correct, but I still like messing with him occasionally, because his photos are so much better than mine. You know,,, the jealousy thing. :(.... ;). It's like when Stephen Colbert messes with the Presidents or respected dignitaries, usually for humor sake... not because he doesn't like them. (except maybe Uncle Donald). I usually aim at the most thrifty and practical suggestions for the situation. I must quit now, nobody likes reading these long verbose mindless dissertations.
 

Reciprocum

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Agreed.... but how did you know I have photos of pterosaurs and some chipmunks? Seriously, though. One of my main purposes is (semi?) professional photography of my own, mostly high-end real estate listings. The last thing I want is to find out my card is bad after I've spent a couple of hours shooting the interior and exterior of a 7,000 sq.ft. home. Also, I think with the new USB 3.2 connection on the a7r IVa, I might just do my transfers that way.
My A1 files are smaller than your files will be and I gave up using USB transfers if I have more than 20 images on card. I think I even timed it once - just out of curiosity - with a full 128gb card (1700 RAW files) and it took 1h40 over USB and less than 10 minutes with USB-c card reader.
 
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Lake Travis Doug

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You are correct. The USB3 port can do that. And, in previous post, I failed to mention using two of the 256 cards for redundancy, which is what I use religiously. Then there's not much risk. And for your real estate stuff, this should be safe enough w two 256s. Of course, Afonso is right in that there is always a remote risk of a card anomaly, but redundancy should minimize that.

And the reason for my pref for large SDs is that I have a stable full of small worthless 4GB to 64GB cards I never use. Hence the wisdom, buy the biggest capacity you can afford. That's likely what Afonso meant when saying "Buy wisely in the beginning (large ones). That way, the only real risk is if they go bad inside the camera... which is remotely possible. Client work needs redundancy and backup archives, as you already know.

Afonso is usually correct, but I still like messing with him occasionally, because his photos are so much better than mine. You know,,, the jealousy thing. :(.... ;). It's like when Stephen Colbert messes with the Presidents or respected dignitaries, usually for humor sake... not because he doesn't like them. (except maybe Uncle Donald). I usually aim at the most thrifty and practical suggestions for the situation. I must quit now, nobody likes reading these long verbose mindless dissertations.
I do, and I'm prone to them from time-to-time. I need to get more familiar with the forum first
My A1 files are smaller than your files will be and I gave up using USB transfers if I have more than 20 images on card. I think I even timed it once - just out of curiosity - with a full 128gb card (1700 RAW files) and it took 1h40 over USB and less than 10 minutes with USB-c card reader.
Well, that kills that idea
 

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The RIV I believe has a buffer limit of 68 uncompressed RAW. If you go to Crop mode it goes to around 200. With a loss of pixels obviously.
I have ran out of SD card space and switched to Crop mode to finish. Quality still great due to not having to crop as much, or any.
I would test it for solid numbers but mine is in the box getting ready to be sold, replace with the A1. Love both just cannot afford to feed them all.
 
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Lake Travis Doug

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Using these, Doug. Seem to be working very well and fast. Big help with the buffering
I had a couple of Lexar cards for my D7100, had issues with both after about a year.
 

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I use Sony Tough 277mb on my RIV, and would say I wish I had the faster one at times, as it can take time to write if you shoot at 10fps, and it stops you changing settings while writing.
 
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Lake Travis Doug

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I use Sony Tough 277mb on my RIV, and would say I wish I had the faster one at times, as it can take time to write if you shoot at 10fps, and it stops you changing settings while writing.
Those are what I ordered. I may think more on it and send those back in favor of the 300mb ones.
 

Lake Travis Doug

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I figured what-the-heck, I've spent so much on the new a7r IVa, lenses, extra battery, etcetera, I ordered these and will either return the 277/150's I ordered or keep them for when I'm going to shoot a ton of photos, but not shooting in bursts.
 

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